Tag Archives: weekly review

Weekend reflection and reading

Morning all. Happy Easter weekend! Here’s what I’ve been reading and thinking about this week. It’s pretty business and startup-heavy this week, so if that doesn’t interest you, just check back in next week.

Books

Links

  • Serial entrepreneur Jay Samit on the SellPersonal podcast: I’d honestly never heard of Jay Samit until I listened to this interview, but I was blown away. He clearly and concisely laid out how you can look around for problems that need to be solved, and go solve them, and build great companies in the process. I also picked up his book Disrupt You! after I’d listened to this interview.
  • The only entrepreneurship reading list you need: my old boss Tucker Max continued his Asshole to CEO series with a fantastic reading list on startups and entrepreneurship. I’ll give you the Cliff Notes: Paul Graham, good, Guy Kawasaki, bad.
  • Paul Graham on how to get startup ideas: Tucker’s list sent me down a bit of a rabbit hole on Paul Graham’s essays, but this is one of the best. Just like Jay Samit said: look for problems that need solving.
  • The Marc Andreessen Guide to Startups: again, one from Tucker’s list — I hadn’t seen these essays before, but Marc Andreessen (Netscape, Opsware, Ning, Andreessen Horowitz) is basically the best there is when it comes to talking about tech and startups. He talks from a place of huge experience, and this is a great read. Pretty short too.
  • 90 Day Goal Setting and Action Step Planning Template: this is one of the resources from my friend Taylor Pearson‘s book. Hugely useful and practical way to break down your long-term goals into 90 day steps, then monthly, weekly and daily. I’ll definitely be using this.
  • 10 Habits of Unsuccessful People You Don’t Want to Copy: Taleb would call this “via negativa”. Munger would call it “inverting the problem”. Whatever you want to call it, you can really progress by just trying to avoid making mistakes. Here are 10 habits you should stay away from.

My hot streak of writing has continued. Now up to two weeks, every day, without fail. I like it — I like the routine, and I like that it forces me to commit thoughts to paper. I’ll continue with it.

Last week I wrote that I had 3 main goals right now:

  1. Building a repeatable, scalable way to get leads for my copywriting business
  2. Getting back in the gym and in shape
  3. Finding a weekly goal review and tracking system to use

On 1) things are good. I signed three more clients this week, probably for longer-term work, which is great. I think the main channel of growth is going to be word of mouth — and right now, I’m busy enough that the word of mouth engine is in full swing. My plan from here is to basically get enough clients that I’m working full-time, and if people are still wanting to work with me, I’ll slowly increase my rates to manage demand. I know that a lot of people want to do the same, so once I have a little more time (and I’m sure I can turn it into a full-time business) I’m going to write up a full case study of exactly what I did, and the results I got. I’ll include all the emails, spreadsheets, and other resources that I used as well.

I didn’t work out at all this week — again — but I did monitor my weight closely, and eat well throughout the week, so I still lost 1.5 lbs. But that wasn’t the goal: exercise was the goal. I failed. MUST fix this next week, as a matter of urgency.

And finally, I found a great planning and tracking system — Taylor’s90 Day Goal Setting and Action Step Planning Template that I linked above. Not much else to say here other than that it’s fantastic, and I’ll definitely be using it.

Goals for next week:

  1. Get in the gym at least once
  2. Continue to grow copywriting business
  3. Publish on blog every day
  4. Begin 90 day goal setting and action step planning

Weekend reflection and reading

This is the first week in maybe 5 years when I’ve written as much as I have. I’ve posted every day for the last 5 days, and will continue to post daily for as long as possible just to keep the chain going. I’m enjoying the routine, and I’m enjoying the uptick in traffic too, so if you’re reading this, thank you 🙂

My big goal right now is building a repeatable, scalable system to generate leads for my copywriting business. Right now I’m doing a lot of haphazard, ad-hoc outbound sales and network marketing, which is OK, but isn’t systematic. I need a way to produce reliable, consistent leads and sales. I need to think about how best to do that, and how to build it.

On the plus side, I had some great conversations with potential clients and potential sources of leads and JV deals this week, which was really positive. They were the type of things that will probably lead to good income streams in a few weeks or months, but won’t put cash in the bank right this second. Which is fine, it just makes me wish I’d done them a few weeks ago, but there you go. The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago, and the second best time is now.

I didn’t work out at all this week — had a minor injury that I didn’t want to aggravate, so I skipped the gym, but I can already feel myself getting out of the habit. I need to correct that as soon as possible.

Also, in future I want to make this weekly goal review more structured and systematic too. I want to figure out a way to do that that isn’t too burdensome. I’ve seen some people use systems like this that look good on paper, but would be way too complex to start with, so I want something more basic. I’ll work this out this week.

Anyway, here’s a collection of things I’ve been reading this week, and recommend you peruse over your leisurely weekend. Enjoy.

Links

  • Real World Blueprint for a $5million week – Ramit Sethi goes into deep, intense detail about a product launch at his company, I Will Teach You To Be Rich. Ramit is one of the best in the business when it comes to online sales and marketing, so you can learn a ton from him. But more importantly: don’t try super-advanced tactics if you’re just starting out. Get the fundamentals right, and build from there.
  • Career advice no-one tells you – job requirements are negotiable, imposter syndrome is a good things, and other unconventional job hunting advice. What I love most in this article is the concept of doing the job you want before you’ve got it. Just start doing stuff, and send it to the person you want to hire you. If it’s good, they won’t ignore it.
  • Don’t say “maybe” if you want to say “no” – good piece from Ryan Holiday on not being afraid to turn down things that you just don’t want to do. It’s your time, your life, so protect it.
  • The Million Dollar Question – this is an older essay by Sebastian Marshall that PERFECTLY encapsulates the issues and insecurities of taking an unconventional path in your career and your life. It’s a big fear that I have as I move towards more freelance and entrepreneurial projects, and something that I’m wrestling with right now, so it was good to read this again.

Books

  • The Millionaire Fastlane – I love the central idea of this book — that the only way to really get wealthy before you’re old is entrepreneurship and building income-producing assets — but god, the title is awful. It sounds like a bad infomercial and makes me not want to recommend it. A good read though.
  • Berkshire Hathaway Letters to Shareholders – I’m a huge Warren Buffett/Charlie Munger fanboy, and there’s more wisdom in this book than an entire MBA course. But it’s a long read — it’s just a collection of every letter to BH shareholders from 1965-2014. For edited excerpts of these letters, check out The Essays of Warren Buffett, and for more on Charlie Munger, Tren Griffin’s recent book Charlie Munger: The Complete Investor is really good.
  • The End of Jobs – my buddy Taylor Pearson’s first (but probably not last) book is a fantastic argument that traditional jobs are in terminal decline, and that you should start to move towards a more entrepreneurial career path. Taylor’s a great writer — his essays are testament to that — and this is an important and timely book. Pair it with Choose Yourself, which covers similar ground but from a more inspirational point of view (Taylor’s book is more the nuts and bolts, practical advice).