Tag Archives: advice

How to instantly make your writing better

There’s one trick to great writing that you’re almost certainly not using. And it’s really, really simple.

You ready for it?

Read everything you write, out loud.

You’ll feel stupid and self-conscious at first. Do it anyway. Push through. Don’t just read it under your breath. You have to literally verbalise every single word, from start to finish.

If you do that, you will instantly notice:

  • awkwardly-worded phrases
  • unnecessary repetition
  • spelling and grammar mistakes
  • boring, run-on sentences that never seem to end, even when you think they should, but instead you just keep using comma, after comma, after comma, until you fall asleep

I know multiple best-selling authors that use this trick. It’s why, if you’re writing a book, you should always produce an audiobook as well — not because the audiobook will sell a ton of copies, but because being forced to sit down and read your book out loud will make it at least 10% better, and often 40-50% better.

In fact, one writer I know who has worked on multiple books, screenplays, magazine articles and more — he’s a complete rockstar — told me he never submits anything without reading it out loud first. Not a manuscript, not an article, not even a tweet or an email. He reads literally everything out loud. And it’s a big part of the reason why he’s now a professional.

Sure, it takes time. It’s much easier to skip this step. Which is why doing it is valuable.

Want to turbocharge your career and boost your earnings? Check out my upcoming book, The Career Superpower.

Why you shouldn’t care at all about the Eurozone crisis

If you’re an individual or a small business, you don’t need to worry about the Eurozone crisis. You don’t need to think about the ongoing recession. It should be the last thing on your mind.

Why? Is this not the worst recession since the Great Depression? Could this not be The End of the Eurozone?

Yeah, maybe. But ask yourself this:

Can you do anything to change it?

You can’t set fiscal and monetary policy. You can’t force Greece or Portugal (or the US) to cut spending. You can’t force companies to invest more.

So stop worrying about it. It’s out of your control.

What should you worry about? I’m glad you asked.

People: get your finances in order. Stop overspending. Look at earning more money through a second job or freelancing if you need to. Start eating healthily and exercising regularly. Take time every day to be grateful for the good things in your life. Think how you can do your job better: make a list of ideas and pick the best two, and start doing that.

Businesses: stay focused on your customer. Always think what they would want you to do. Even in this economy there are opportunities – Groupon is the fastest-growing company in history by revenues, and was formed in November 2008. There is money to be made, and people will fall over themselves to give you their money, if you can give them what they want or need.

In other words, focus on things you can control. Forget about things you can’t.

Want to turbocharge your career and boost your earnings? Check out my upcoming book, The Career Superpower.